Immigration policy needs more than barriers

It’s really complicated. . . .

 

By Dr. Larry Fedewa (January 13, 2019)

The immigration situation in the United States is a total mess. Yes, we need barriers where terrain permits. But that is just the tip of the iceberg. To snapshot the most urgent challenges, let’s look at three of the categories of  immigration policy that need to be fixed: 1) border enforcement, 2) citizenship qualifications, and 3) visa procedures.

BORDER Protection  

  • Barriers – Right now there are long stretches of the southern border which have no impediments to anyone crossing from Mexico to the USA other than the occasional presence of Border Patrol agents. There are not enough of these agents available to present a consistent obstacle to trespassers. In fact, it would take an army to effectively guard all these approaches. The only effective deterrent in such terrain is a wall, such as that in San Diego, which has reduced alien traffic by 96% (since 1986 before the wall was built.) Also, such barriers work both ways to prevent human trafficking in and out of the USA.
  • Catch and Release – current laws provide that anyone caught illegally entering the USA can be deported back across the border, UNLESS the individual claims asylum. In that case, the person must come before a US judge who will determine whether the claim is valid or not. Since the word is out among the masses, nearly all the illegals now claim asylum. But there are not enough judges  to handle the caseload of thousands of migrants. Nor are there anywhere near adequate facilities to house the asylum-seekers until they can appear before the court. This has led to “catch and release” the defendants with a summons to appear before the court sometime in the future, usually months. These folks are turned loose – in many cases never to be seen again.

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Shutdown and Stand-off!

What the heck is going on?                                             

 

By Dr. Larry Fedewa (January 6, 2019)

One quarter of the United States federal government is closed. Unless you are a federal employee or contractor, you probably haven’t noticed this – yet. But the longer this closing goes on, the more impact it will have on ordinary people. For example, the IRS is not processing refunds – not much of a problem so far but will be in another month. And so it goes with several other agencies.

What then is causing all this disruption? Whose fault is it? How will it be resolved?

The U.S. government has closed a portion of its services because of a dispute between Republicans and Democrats over money. Is the dispute over how best to balance the federal budget? Not so lucky. The dispute is over a$5 billion-line-item – which sounds like a lot of money until you realize that the total federal budget is $4.407 trillion. Since one trillion equals 1000 times one billion, the amount in dispute is such a small percentage of the total budget that you couldn’t even get that number on a calculator – too many zeros.

If the dispute therefore  is not really about money, what is the problem? The problem is that this line item is the funding for a series of walls on the U.S. southern border with Mexico wherever the terrain permits. This proposal builds on the experience of the wall in San Diego which has reduced the flow of illegal immigrants by 96% since 1986 (before the wall was built). While it has been spectacularly successful in its intended purpose, however, smuggling especially of drugs has increased dramatically. Therefore it seems necessary to increase staffing and technology at the ports of entry as well as construction of additional walls in order to  effect improved border security.

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December 26, 2018 The Dr. Larry Show

What is the meaning of Christmas in 2018?

Featured Guest: Monsignor Michael D. Murphy                 

Monsignor Michael D. Murphy

A beloved Catholic priest in the Diocese of Lansing Michigan. Ordained in 1966, retired 2011: 45 years active ministry, serving as pastor, Moderator of the Curia and Vicar General, Diocese of Lansing. Entered Senior priest status in 2011. Lifetime of outstanding service to the people of Lansing, as counselor, pastor, innovator and member of various diocesan and community boards and committees.

Msgr. Murphy joins Dr. Larry at 7-8 pm, on Wednesday, December 26, 2018 to deliver his Christmas message. Tune in to www.TheBatchelorPadNetwork.com

https://bit.ly/2BTSbVN

Christmas 2018 – What does it mean?

Is Christmas relevant in 2018?                               

by Dr. Larry Fedewa, December 22, 2018

As we look around at the Christmas decorations, programs,
ceremonies, shopping, cards, greetings and the whole
Christmas season, what messages do we get?

What does it all mean?

Clearly, something unusual and good is in the air. People seem friendlier, parties and benefits are everywhere. Charities, soap kitchens, and the Salvation Army are busier than usual.

When we think of the origin of Christmas, we realize that it began as a celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ. Today, however, it is possible to go through the entire Christmastime without ever hearing that name. Many children are taught that the central figure of Christmas is Santa Claus on his mission of kindness and goodwill.

So, what about this Jesus Christ? Is he still important, even relevant?  Keep Reading

In defense of Aaron Rodgers

Aaron Rodgers is taking heat for the Packers’ losing season. Forget 400+ passes without an interception.  IMO, Mark Murphy should be taking a lot of that blame. Rodgers is an extraordinary QB, not only for his arm strength and accuracy, but also because he is a master at extending a play. Many of his “miracle” passes have been caught by the few receivers who understand how to get open during the extra time Aaron manufactures. They have developed a special set of skills to complement Rodgers — skills so unusual that neither they nor Aaron can work those miracles alone. The primary player in this Packer generation has been Jordy Nelson. Murphy traded him to save money. The kids who came in behind him haven’t had time to learn what he knew. The only other Aaron twin is Randall Cobb, who spent most of the year on IR. Adams and the other Rodgers are coming along but they are not there yet. So, management decides to make the Packers a running team. When that doesn’t work, Murphy fires McCarthy. When that doesn’t work, they start blaming Rodgers. IMO, they should start at the top!

Republicans in the secular city: condemned by history?

By Dr. Larry Fedewa (December 15, 2018)

The 2016 update of the 2010 U.S. Census shows the current distribution of the U.S. population at 80.3% urban and 19.7% rural. (Michael Ratcliff, Geography Division, U.S. 2010 Census Report, issued  December 2016)  This simple fact is perhaps the most significant reality in the current political polarization of the United States’ electorate. On its face, it signifies that the current Republican Party is doomed to disappear unless it can make some fundamental changes.

To detail some of the differences between urban and rural realities, let’s look at a few.
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Let’s Talk: Saudis and Immigration

Holier than thou?

By Dr. Larry Fedewa (December 7, 2018)

In all the conversations. interviews, and debates about issues of the day, a few stand out as particularly irksome, on one or both sides. The first issue is the American politicians’ tendency to show a residual streak of puritanism – thought to have worn out over these many years. Apparently not.

There seems to be an underlying missionary zeal which impels American politicians on occasion to judge another nation’s behavior as sinful and then to punish that country and presume to preach to them how they should behave. It is one thing to object strenuously to behavior which directly attacks a stated interest of the United States, as in th e case of North Korea’s nuclear threats to the United States mainland. It is something altogether different to scold and punish another country for an act which has no impact on American interests, such as the Khashoggi assassination.  Keep Reading

11/26/2018 The Dr. Larry Show (podcast)

https://goo.gl/HAkzZ5  TOPIC: CHINA – TRADE AND TERRITORY and the future of  USA alliances

Guest: 
Professor Peter Mansoor
The Ohio State University

General Raymond E. Mason Jr. Chair of Military History

(2008-present)

Colonel, U.S. Army (ret)Twenty-six-year veteran with many assignments, the last being  Executive Officer to General David Petraeus, Commander, Multi-National Force-Iraq
– Founding Director, U.S. Army/Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Center
– Senior Military Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations
– Commander, 1st Brigade, 1st Armored Division

 

China: What’s Next?

Will the Democrats help China defeat the USA?        

By Dr. Larry Fedewa (November 24, 2018

Former Virginia Governor James Gilmore wrote in these pages. “America today is in a world-wide conflict to determine how mankind will live in the years ahead.  This conflict engages all aspects of national power: military, economic, diplomatic, and the competition of values.” (October 12, 2018) As Chairman of the Gilmore Commission (1999-2003) which presented a comprehensive study of America’s national security status and options, as well as his current position as head of a Washington think tank, Governor Gilmore is widely respected as an analyst of American foreign policy. On my radio show, he added that America is already in a non-shooting war with China. His opinion is shared by many other keen observers.

Governor Gilmore cites a little-known document published by the Trump Administration called the National  Security Strategy (2017), which enunciates clearly the goals of a successful outcome for the United States in the contest with China for maintaining our position as the world’s primary superpower.

Why do we care? Because America’s status as the most powerful nation in the world has been essential to avoiding World War III, since America took over world leadership following World War II. Prior to 1948, under British leadership, there had been two world wars in the prior two generations, both originating in Europe and spreading to the much of the world because of European colonialism and the industrialization of Asian powers.  Keep Reading